Hypothermia protects cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells against indocyanine green toxicity

Hiroshi Kunikata, Hiroshi Tomita, Toshiaki Abe, Hiromi Murata, Yoshiko Sagara, Hajime Sato, Yuko Wada, Nobuo Fuse, Yoichi Nakagawa, Makoto Tamai, Kohji Nishida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether indocyanine green (ICG) is toxic to cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells, and whether hypothermia can protect the ARPE-19 cells against the ICG toxicity. Methods: Cultured ARPE-19 cells were exposed to 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 mg/mL of ICG dye at 37 and 4°C for 30 min. The percentage of ARPE-19 cells that survived was determined by resazurin 1 day after the exposure. Results: Exposure of the RPE cells to a hypotonic saline solution with an osmolarity equal to 5 mg/mL of ICG did not induce a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of RPE cells that survived. Exposure of the ARPE-19 cells to ICG induced a significant decrease in the percentage of cell survival at all concentrations of ICG (P < 0.05), except in 0.25 mg/mL at 37°C. At 4°C, on the other hand, ICG induced a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of RPE cell survival only at 5 mg/mL of ICG (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These results indicate that ICG is toxic to human RPE cells in culture, and that cell death cannot be attributed to the low osmolarity. Hypothermia of 4°C has a protective effect against ICG toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-39
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Feb

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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