Hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex is associated with lower bone mass density in elderly women with osteopenia and Alzheimer’s disease

Yumi Takano, Tatsushi Mutoh, Yasuko Tatewaki, Toshiki Seki, Shuzo Yamamoto, Hayato Odagiri, Hiroyuki Arai, Yasuyuki Taki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Accelerated bone loss is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and imaging markers of neurodegeneration remains uncertain. We examined the effect of low bone mass (osteopenia) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD (n = 19) and non-demented aging (n = 12). We enrolled 31 female outpatients diagnosed with osteopenia (age ≥ 65 years) who had both a single-photon emission computed tomography brain scan and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry bone scan taken at their initial investigation. We analyzed the relationship between osteopenia (−2.5 < T-score < −1) and rCBF in 62 cortical areas measured using the stereotactic extraction estimation analysis on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (mean Z-scores). We found that the mean Z-scores of 14 cerebral subregions, most of which are often affected early in AD, were significantly lower in the AD group than the non-demented group (P <.001). The age-stratified multivariate regression analysis showed that the decreased rCBF in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) was an independent predictor of osteopenia (r = −0.395; P =.005). BMD and rCBF in the left PCC were significantly correlated in the overall population (r = −0.54; P =.001), as well as the AD group (r = −0.514; P =.02). These imaging data suggest that osteopenia may contribute to neurodegeneration of a brain network hub associated with AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-371
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Mar 1

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • bone mineral density
  • cerebral blood flow
  • elderly women
  • osteopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology (medical)

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