Hypocenter distribution and heterogeneous seismic velocity structure in and around the focal area of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake, NE Japan - Possible seismological evidence for a fluid driven compressional inversion earthquake

Tomomi Okada, Norihito Umino, Akira Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have done seismic tomography in and around the focal area of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake (M 7.2) occurred on June 14, 2008 in NE Japan. We used data from temporary aftershock observation network deployed just after the occurrence of the present earthquake. Based on the distribution of aftershocks, the fault plane of the mainshock is inferred to dip to the west. Small immediate foreshocks and preceding seismic activity in 1999-2000 on the fault plane in the vicinity of the hypocenter of the mainshock of this earthquake were observed. Lower-seismic-velocity hanging wall can be imaged in the central and the northern part of the focal area. This possibly suggests the present earthquake is a compressional inversion earthquake. The low-velocity zone in the lower crust extends upward to the upper crust, branches into three portions and reaches each active volcano. This low-velocity region can be seen just beneath the mainshock hypocenter and the whole focal area, suggesting that crustal fluid possibly promote the occurrence of the 2008 earthquake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)717-728
Number of pages12
Journalearth, planets and space
Volume64
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Aftershock
  • Crustal fluid
  • Foreshock
  • Inversion tectonics
  • Seismic velocity structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Space and Planetary Science

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