Hydrogen entry into Fe and high strength steels under simulated atmospheric corrosion

Eiji Akiyama, Songjie Li, Tadashi Shinohara, Zuogui Zhang, Kaneaki Tsuzaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrochemical hydrogen permeation tests of Fe sheets under two cyclic corrosion test (CCT) conditions were performed to understand hydrogen entry behavior under atmospheric corrosions. Hydrogen entry into 1300 MPa-class high strength steels under two CCT conditions was also investigated using thermal desorption analysis. One CCT consisted of salt spray, dry and wet stages (Salt Spray CCT; SSCCT), and the other consisted of dry and wet stages after NaCl deposition (Dry-Wet CCT; DWCCT). The corrosion rates of Fe and the steels were almost constant under SSCCT and they decreased under DWCCT with time. Nevertheless, both CCTs resulted in increases in hydrogen permeation current and diffusible hydrogen content with time indicating enhancement of hydrogen entry. Corrosion current monitored by means of an atmospheric corrosion monitoring sensor consisting of Fe anode and Ag cathode decreased obviously under dry stage of the CCTs, whereas hydrogen permeation was high at the beginning of the dry stage. The discrepancy between hydrogen entry and corrosion rate indicates that the hydrogen entry is not directly controlled by corrosion rate. Increase in acidity of underlying rust layer with growth of rust layer monitored using a W/WO3 electrode is considered to be one of the factors affecting the hydrogen entry efficiency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1799-1805
Number of pages7
JournalElectrochimica Acta
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 15
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atmospheric corrosion
  • Delayed fracture
  • High strength steel
  • Hydrogen embrittlement
  • Hydrogen permeation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Electrochemistry

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