Hydrogen embrittlement resistances of alloying elements adding ultrahigh-strength low-alloy TRIP-aided steels

Tomohiko Hojo, Junya Kobayashi, Koh Ichi Sugimoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To develop ultra high strength steels for automotive impact safety parts, effects of alloying elements on hydrogen embrittlement resistance of ultra high strength low alloy TRIP-aided steels with martensitic matrix (TM steel) were investigated. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibilities of TRIP-aided steels were decreased by addition of alloying elements although tensile strength and diffusible hydrogen concentration of alloying elements adding TM steels were increased compared with base steel. Particularly, when 1.0 mass% chromium was added to the TM steels, TM steel indicated low hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It is considered that uniform and refined lath matrix and retained austenite/matrix interface absorbed a large amount of diffusible hydrogen in order to suppress hydrogen trapping to the grain boundaries and the lath boundaries and strain induced transformation of stable retained austenite suppressed initiation and growth of voids and initiation and propagation of cracks effectively.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAIST Steel Properties and Applications Conference Proceedings - Combined with MS and T'12, Materials Science and Technology 2012
Pages393-401
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Nov 19
Externally publishedYes
Event2012 AIST Steel Properties and Applications Conference, Held in Conjunction with the Materials Science and Technology 2012 Conference and Exhibition, MS and T 2012 - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: 2012 Oct 72012 Oct 11

Other

Other2012 AIST Steel Properties and Applications Conference, Held in Conjunction with the Materials Science and Technology 2012 Conference and Exhibition, MS and T 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period12/10/712/10/11

Keywords

  • Alloying elements
  • Hydrogen embrittlement
  • Retained austenite
  • TRIP
  • Ultra high strength steel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Metals and Alloys

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