Hydrodynamic interaction between two red blood cells in simple shear flow: Its impact on the rheology of a semi-dilute suspension

Toshihiro Omori, Takuji Ishikawa, Yohsuke Imai, Takami Yamaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood is a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) and its rheology is important when discussing the physiology of the cardiovascular system. In this study, we performed a numerical investigation of the rheological properties of an RBC suspension from the dilute to semi-dilute regime. RBCs were modelled as a capsule with a two-dimensional hyperelastic membrane. Large deformation of the thin membrane was calculated by a finite element method. Due to the small size of the RBC, fluid motion around the RBC was assumed to follow Stokes flow and was solved by a boundary element method. In the dilute limit, cell–cell interactions were omitted and the bulk stress of the suspension was calculated by the stresslet generated on a single RBC. Interestingly, the effective shear viscosity of the dilute suspension decreased with increasing viscosity of the internal liquid. In the semi-dilute regime, cells can be considered as showing pairwise interactions. The effective shear viscosity of the semi-dilute suspension shows a quadratic increase with respect to the volume fraction. These findings are important for understanding the complex phenomena of blood rheology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)933-941
Number of pages9
JournalComputational Mechanics
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 1

Keywords

  • Boundary element method
  • Dilute suspension
  • Red blood cell
  • Rheology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

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