Human muse cells, nontumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have liver regeneration capacity through specific homing and cell replacement in a mouse model of liver fibrosis

Masahiro Iseki, Yoshihiro Kushida, Shohei Wakao, Takahiro Akimoto, Masamichi Mizuma, Fuyuhiko Motoi, Ryuta Asada, Shinobu Shimizu, Michiaki Unno, Gregorio Chazenbalk, Mari Dezawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Muse cells, a novel type of nontumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, reside in the bone marrow, skin, and adipose tissue and are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-derived Muse cells to repair an immunodeficient mouse model of liver fibrosis was evaluated in this study. The cells exhibited the ability to spontaneously differentiate into hepatoblast/hepatocyte lineage cells in vitro. They demonstrated a high migration capacity toward the serum and liver section of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated in the liver, but not in other organs except, to a lesser extent, in the lungs at 2 weeks after intravenous injection in the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1 ± 15.2%), human albumin (54.3 ± 8.2%), and anti-trypsin (47.9 ± 4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human CYP1A2 and human Glc-6-Pase at 8 weeks after injection. Recovery in serum, total bilirubin, and albumin and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse cell-transplanted group and the control groups, which received the vehicle or the same number of a non-Muse cell population of MSCs (MSCs in which Muse cells were eliminated). Thus, unlike ESCs and iPSCs, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into the damaged liver after intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They may repair liver fibrosis by two simple steps: expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. A therapeutic strategy such as this is feasible and may provide significant advancements toward liver regeneration in patients with liver disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)821-840
Number of pages20
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Fibrolysis
  • Hepatocytes
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)
  • Pluripotent stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation

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