How oligomerization contributes to the thermostability of an archaeon protein: Protein L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase from Sulfolobus tokodaii

Yoshikazu Tanakai, Kouhei Tsumoto, Yoshiaki Yasutake, Mitsuo Umetsu, Min Yao, Harumi Fukada, Isao Tanaka, Izumi Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study how oligomerization may contribute to the thermostability of archaeon proteins, we focused on a hexameric protein, protein L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase from Sulfolobus tokodaii (StoPIMT). The crystal structure shows that StoPIMT has a distinctive hexameric structure composed of monomers consisting of two domains: an S-adenosylmethionine- dependent methyl-transferase fold domain and a C-terminal α-helical domain. The hexameric structure includes three interfacial contact regions: major, minor, and coiled-coil. Several C-terminal deletion mutants were constructed and characterized. The hexameric structure and thermostability were retained when the C-terminal α-helical domain (Ty206-Thr 231) was deleted, suggesting that oligomerization via coiled-coil association using the C-terminal α-helical domains did not contribute critically to hexamerization or to the increased thermostability of the protein. Deletion of three additional residues located in the major contact region, Tyr203-Asp204-Asp205, led to a significant decrease in hexamer stability and chemico/thermostability. Although replacement of Thr146 and Asp204, which form two hydrogen bonds in the interface in the major contact region, with Ala did not affect hexamer formation, these mutations led to a significant decrease in thermostability, suggesting that two residues in the major contact region make significant contributions to the increase in stability of the protein via hexamerization. These results suggest that cooperative hexamerization occurs via interactions of "hot spot" residues and that a couple of interfacial hot spot residues are responsible for enhancing thermostability via oligomerization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32957-32967
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume279
Issue number31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jul 30

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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