How cognitive typology affects second language acquisition: A study of Japanese and Chinese learners of English

Ryan Spring, Kaoru Horie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study looks at the effect of one's first language type, as proposed by Talmy (2000) and Slobin (2004), on their second language acquisition. Talmy (2000) gives an account of languages as being either verb-framed or satellite-framed based on how path and manner of motion are encoded in motion events. Meanwhile, Slobin (2004) argues for a third language type, which he calls equipollently-framed. This study compares and contrasts the learning curves of equipollently-framed language (Mandarin Chinese) native speakers and verb-framed language (Japanese) native speakers as they learn a satellite-framed language (English). It examines not only the learner's pattern preferences, but also their manner of motion encoding preferences and deictic verb usage to show that there is a clear difference in how the two groups of learners acquire a second language of a different type from their own native language.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689-710
Number of pages22
JournalCognitive Linguistics
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Nov 20

Keywords

  • cognitive typology
  • event conflation
  • motion events
  • second language acquisition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

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