Host plant use for oviposition by Trigonotylus caelestialium (Hemiptera: Miridae) and Stenotus rubrovittatus (Hemiptera: Miridae)

Atsuhiko Nagasawa, Akihiko Takahashi, Hiroya Higuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The main hosts and sites of oviposition for the two bugs, Trigonotylus caelestialium (Kirkaldy) (Hemiptera: Miridae) and Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Miridae), that cause pecky rice were investigated in 24 poaceous plants. Nymphs of T. caelestialium emerged from both spikelets and leaf sheaths, while nymphs of S. rubrovittatus emerged almost exclusively from spikelets. Suitable plants for oviposition by T. caelestialium are Lolium multiflorum, Digitaria violascens and Hordeum murinum, while Poa annua, Anthoxanthum odoratum, Alopecurus aequalis and D. violascens were preferentially used by S. rubrovittatus. There was a greater difference in the number of nymphs emerging from different plants for S. rubrovittatus than for T. caelestialium. This difference may be because T. caelestialium can oviposit on leaf sheaths if the spikelets are not suitable for oviposition, whereas S. rubrovittatus only oviposits on spikelets. Although both bugs oviposited on spikelets, the internal oviposition sites were different. In D. ciliaris, T. caelestialium laid all eggs between the lemma of the first floret and the second floret, whereas S. rubrovittatus laid eggs almost exclusively inside the second floret. In contrast, in P. annua, T. caelestialium laid all eggs inside the florets, whereas S. rubrovittatus laid eggs both between and inside the florets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-339
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Entomology and Zoology
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Nov 1

Keywords

  • Oviposition preference
  • Pecky rice
  • Poaceous plants
  • Rice leaf bug
  • Sorghum plant bug

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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