High-gamma activity in an attention network predicts individual differences in elderly adults' behavioral performance

Yoritaka Akimoto, Takayuki Nozawa, Akitake Kanno, Mizuki Ihara, Takakuni Goto, Takeshi Ogawa, Toshimune Kambara, Motoaki Sugiura, Eiichi Okumura, Ryuta Kawashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study used a magnetoencephalogram to investigate the relationship between high-gamma (52-100. Hz) activity within an attention network and individual differences in behavioral performance among healthy elderly adults. We analyzed brain activity in 41 elderly subjects performing a 3-stimulus visual oddball task. In addition to the average amplitude of event-related fields in the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS), high-gamma power in the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG), the strength of high-gamma imaginary coherence between the right MFG and the left MFG, and those between the right MFG and the left thalamus predicted individual differences in reaction time. In addition, high-gamma power in the left MFG was correlated with task accuracy, whereas high-gamma power in the left thalamus and left IPS was correlated with individual processing speed. The direction of correlations indicated that higher high-gamma power or coherence in an attention network was associated with better task performance and, presumably, higher cognitive function. Thus, high-gamma activity in different regions of this attention network differentially contributed to attentional processing, and such activity could be a fundamental process associated with individual differences in cognitive aging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-300
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroImage
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 15

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Attention
  • High-gamma activities
  • Individual differences
  • Reaction time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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