High frequency of repeated infections due to emerging genotypes of human respiratory syncytial viruses among children during eight successive epidemic seasons in Japan

Masahiro Yamaguchi, Yasuko Sano, Isolde C. Dapat, Reiko Saito, Yasushi Suzuki, Akihiko Kumaki, Yugo Shobugawa, Clyde Dapat, Makoto Uchiyama, Hiroshi Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In eight successive seasons (2001 to 2009), a total of 726 human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections from a total of 1,560 children with acute lower respiratory tract illness were identified. Molecular analysis of the attachment (G) protein gene confirmed that 52 (7.8%) children were infected more than once with any of the 3 genotypes of HRSV-A (genotypes GA5, NA1, and NA2) and/or 6 genotypes of HRSV-B (genotypes BA4, BA5, and BA7 to BA10). Repeated infections in 46 cases (82.1%) occurred in the next season, and only one case occurred in the same season (10-day interval). First infections were 33 (63.5%) HRSV-A cases and 19 (36.5%) HRSV-B cases, whereas second infections occurred in 35 (67.3%) HRSV-A cases and 17 (32.7%) HRSV-B cases. Third infections were attributed to 4 (100.0%) HRSV-A cases. Homologous subgroup reinfections were detected in 28 cases, 23 HRSV-A cases and 5 HRSV-B cases (P = 0.005), whereas homologous genotype reinfections were detected only for 5 HRSV-A cases (2GA5 and 3NA2) but not any HRSV-B case. Heterologous subgroup reinfections were detected in 28 cases, 12 cases from HRSV-A-to-HRSV-B reinfections and 16 cases from HRSV-B-to-HRSV-A reinfections. Genotypes NA1 and NA2 had higher numbers of heterologous genotype infections than did other genotypes. Our observations suggest that repeated infections occur more frequently in HRSV-A strains than in HRSV-B strains, and heterologous genotype reinfections occur more frequently than homologous genotype reinfections, especially in the case of the emerging genotypes NA1 and NA2 of HRSV-A strains that circulated in the community during our study period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1034-1040
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Mar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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