High central blood pressure is associated with incident cardiovascular events in treated hypertensives: the ABC-J II Study

the ABC-J II Investigator Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is not established whether central blood pressure (BP) evaluated by a radial pulse wave analysis is useful to predict cardiovascular prognoses. We tested the hypothesis that central BP predicts future cardiovascular events in treated hypertensive subjects. We conducted a multicenter, observational cohort study of 3566 hypertensives being treated with antihypertensive medications at 27 institutions in Japan. We performed the radial pulse wave analyses using applanation tonometry in all subjects. The primary outcome was the incidence of any of the following: stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), sudden cardiac death, and acute aortic dissection. The mean age of the subjects was 66.0 ± 10.9 years, and 50.6% were male. The mean brachial SBP and central SBP were 138 ± 18 mm Hg and 128 ± 19 mm Hg, respectively. When the central SBP was divided into quintiles, the number of events was least in the 2nd quintile, and we set it as the reference. In the Cox regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, creatinine, diabetes, use of β-blocker, and history of MI/stroke, the patients in the 3rd (hazard ratio (HR) 3.55, 95% confidence interval 1.29–9.78, p = 0.014), 4th (HR 4.12, 95% CI 1.53–11.10, p = 0.005), and 5th quintiles (HR 2.87, 95% CI 1.01–8.18, p = 0.048) had a significantly higher incidence of cardiovascular events compared to the 2nd quintile. The results were essentially unchanged when brachial DBP was additionally adjusted. In conclusion, in treated hypertensives, high central SBP was associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)947-956
Number of pages10
JournalHypertension Research
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'High central blood pressure is associated with incident cardiovascular events in treated hypertensives: the ABC-J II Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this