Hand motor cortical area reorganization following cerebral infarction evaluated with functional MRI, near infrared spectroscopic imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

H. Kato, M. Izumiyama, Y. Shiga, N. Saito, H. Koizumi, A. Takahashi, Y. Itoyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 60-year-old, right-handed man suffered from left hemiparesis with upper limb dominance. CT and MRI revealed cerebral infarction of the entire right middle cerebral artery territory. His hemiparesis recovered excellently and residual neurological deficits 6 years later were left hand weakness (grasping power 9 kg vs. 35 kg in the right) and clumsiness. Functional MRI was performed. During right (normal) hand grasping, activation was seen in the left sensorimotor cortex and supplementary motor area. During left(paretic) hand grasping, activation was seen in the left (ipsilateral) sensorimotor cortex, right parietal cortex, and bilateral supplementary motor areas. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging showed similar results. During right hand grasping, left sensorimotor cortex was activated, and during left hand grasping, bilateral sensorimotor cortices were activated with ipsilateral predominance. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left motor hand area evoked right hand movement and stimulation of a point near that area evoked ipsilateral left hand muscle movement. Thus, the findings of the three techniques consistently suggest that the recovery of left hemiparesis of this patient was promoted by motor cortical area reorganization including the ipsilateral motor cortex.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)869-874
Number of pages6
JournalBrain and Nerve
Volume53
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Cerebral infarction
  • Functional MRI
  • Hemiparesis
  • Near infrared spectroscopy
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Hand motor cortical area reorganization following cerebral infarction evaluated with functional MRI, near infrared spectroscopic imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this