Growth of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Cattle Manure Compost under Various Temperatures and Ammonia Concentrations

Ryu Oishi, Chika Tada, Ryoki Asano, Nozomi Yamamoto, Yoshihisa Suyama, Yutaka Nakai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A recent study showed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) coexist in the process of cattle manure composting. To investigate their physiological characteristics, liquid cultures seeded with fermenting cattle manure compost were incubated at various temperatures (37°C, 46°C, or 60°C) and ammonium concentrations (0. 5, 1, 4, or 10 mM NH4+-N). The growth rates of the AOB and AOA were monitored using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A genes. AOB grew at 37°C and 4 or 10 mM NH4+-N, whereas AOA grew at 46°C and 10 mM NH4+-N. Incubation with allylthiourea indicated that the AOB and AOA grew by oxidizing ammonia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and subsequent sequencing analyses revealed that a bacterium related to Nitrosomonas halophila and an archaeon related to Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis were the predominant AOB and AOA, respectively, in the seed compost and in cultures after incubation. This is the first report to demonstrate that the predominant AOA in cattle manure compost can grow and can probably oxidize ammonia under moderately thermophilic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)787-793
Number of pages7
JournalMicrobial Ecology
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Soil Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Growth of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Cattle Manure Compost under Various Temperatures and Ammonia Concentrations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this