Ground-based instruments of the PWING project to investigate dynamics of the inner magnetosphere at subauroral latitudes as a part of the ERG-ground coordinated observation network

Kazuo Shiokawa, Yasuo Katoh, Yoshiyuki Hamaguchi, Yuka Yamamoto, Takumi Adachi, Mitsunori Ozaki, Shin Ichiro Oyama, Masahito Nosé, Tsutomu Nagatsuma, Yoshimasa Tanaka, Yuichi Otsuka, Yoshizumi Miyoshi, Ryuho Kataoka, Yuki Takagi, Yuhei Takeshita, Atsuki Shinbori, Satoshi Kurita, Tomoaki Hori, Nozomu Nishitani, Iku ShinoharaFuminori Tsuchiya, Yuki Obana, Shin Suzuki, Naoko Takahashi, Kanako Seki, Akira Kadokura, Keisuke Hosokawa, Yasunobu Ogawa, Martin Connors, J. Michael Ruohoniemi, Mark Engebretson, Esa Turunen, Thomas Ulich, Jyrki Manninen, Tero Raita, Antti Kero, Arto O'Ksanen, Marko Back, Kirsti Kauristie, Jyrki Mattanen, Dmitry Baishev, Vladimir Kurkin, Alexey Oinats, Alexander Pashinin, Roman Vasilyev, Ravil Rakhmatulin, William Bristow, Marty Karjala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The plasmas (electrons and ions) in the inner magnetosphere have wide energy ranges from electron volts to mega-electron volts (MeV). These plasmas rotate around the Earth longitudinally due to the gradient and curvature of the geomagnetic field and by the co-rotation motion with timescales from several tens of hours to less than 10 min. They interact with plasma waves at frequencies of mHz to kHz mainly in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere, obtain energies up to MeV, and are lost into the ionosphere. In order to provide the global distribution and quantitative evaluation of the dynamical variation of these plasmas and waves in the inner magnetosphere, the PWING project (study of dynamical variation of particles and waves in the inner magnetosphere using ground-based network observations, http://www.isee.Nagoya-u.ac.jp/dimr/PWING/) has been carried out since April 2016. This paper describes the stations and instrumentation of the PWING project. We operate all-sky airglow/aurora imagers, 64-Hz sampling induction magnetometers, 40-kHz sampling loop antennas, and 64-Hz sampling riometers at eight stations at subauroral latitudes (~ 60° geomagnetic latitude) in the northern hemisphere, as well as 100-Hz sampling EMCCD cameras at three stations. These stations are distributed longitudinally in Canada, Iceland, Finland, Russia, and Alaska to obtain the longitudinal distribution of plasmas and waves in the inner magnetosphere. This PWING longitudinal network has been developed as a part of the ERG (Arase)-ground coordinated observation network. The ERG (Arase) satellite was launched on December 20, 2016, and has been in full operation since March 2017. We will combine these ground network observations with the ERG (Arase) satellite and global modeling studies. These comprehensive datasets will contribute to the investigation of dynamical variation of particles and waves in the inner magnetosphere, which is one of the most important research topics in recent space physics, and the outcome of our research will improve safe and secure use of geospace around the Earth.[Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Original languageEnglish
Article number160
Journalearth, planets and space
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 1

Keywords

  • All-sky airglow/aurora imager
  • EMCCD camera
  • EMIC wave
  • Induction magnetometer
  • Inner magnetosphere
  • Loop antenna
  • Magnetospheric ELF/VLF wave
  • Radiation belts
  • Riometer
  • SAR arc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Space and Planetary Science

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