Genome-wide association studies for production, respiratory disease, and immune-related traits in Landrace pigs

Yoshinobu Uemoto, Kasumi Ichinoseki, Toshimi Matsumoto, Nozomi Oka, Hironori Takamori, Hiroshi Kadowaki, Chihiro Kojima-Shibata, Eisaku Suzuki, Toshihiro Okamura, Hisashi Aso, Haruki Kitazawa, Masahiro Satoh, Hirohide Uenishi, Keiichi Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Identification of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) related to a chronic respiratory disease such as Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) and immune-related traits is important for the genetic improvement of disease resistance in pigs. The objective of this study was to detect a novel QTL for a total of 22 production, respiratory disease, and immune-related traits in Landrace pigs. A total of 874 Landrace purebred pigs, which were selected based on MPS resistance, were genotyped using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based and haplotype-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to detect a novel QTL and to evaluate the possibility of a pleiotropic QTL for these traits. SNP-based GWAS detected a total of six significant regions in backfat thickness, ratio of granular leucocytes to lymphatic cells, plasma concentration of cortisol at different ages, and complement alternative pathway activity in serum. The significant region detected by haplotype-based GWAS was overlapped across the region detected by SNP-based GWAS. Most of these detected QTL regions were novel regions with some candidate genes located in them. With regard to a pleiotropic QTL among traits, only three of these detected QTL regions overlapped among traits, and many detected regions independently affected the traits.

Original languageEnglish
Article number15823
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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