Genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has recently attracted great attention in the area of oncology. In Japan, since 2014, an anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab and anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab have been available for the treatment of patients with malignant melanoma, and nivolumab has been available for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials using these drugs and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are currently in progress worldwide. The immune checkpoint blockade therapy is a promising new cancer therapy; however, not all patients with cancer can benefit from this therapy. Recent evidence shows that markers reflecting the extent of genetic mutation accumulation, including mutation burden, non-synonymous mutation that produces neoantigen, and microsatellite instability, possibly serve as promising marker to predict who can benefit from the immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Here, I introduce the recent evidence and discuss the correlation between genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)678-682
Number of pages5
JournalJapanese Journal of Cancer and Chemotherapy
Volume43
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun

Keywords

  • Anti-PD-1 antibody
  • Immune checkpoint blockade therapy
  • Microsatellite instability
  • Mutation burden

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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