GAS INFLOW AND OUTFLOW HISTORIES IN DISK GALAXIES AS REVEALED FROM OBSERVATIONS OF DISTANT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

Daisuke Toyouchi, Masashi Chiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate gas inflow and outflow histories in Milky Way-like disk galaxies, to get new insights into the baryonic processes in galaxy formation and evolution. For this purpose, we solve the equations for the evolution of the surface mass densities of gas and metals at each radius in a galactic disk, based on the observed structural properties of distant star-forming galaxies, including the redshift evolution of their stellar mass distribution, their scaling relation between the mass of baryonic components, star formation rate (SFR), and chemical abundance, as well as the supposed evolution of their radial metallicity gradients (RMGs). We find that the efficiency of gas inflow for a given SFR decreases with time and that the inflow rate is always nearly proportional to the SFR. For gas outflow, although its efficiency for a given SFR is a decreasing function of time, similar to gas inflow, the outflow rate is not necessarily proportional to the SFR and the relation between the outflow rate and SFR strongly depends on the evolution of the adopted RMG. We also find that the results on the outflow rate can be reproduced in the framework of a momentum-driven (energy-driven) wind mechanism if the RMG is steepening (flattening) with time. Therefore if the well-measured RMGs and their evolution for Milky Way-like galaxies are obtained from future observations, then our results will be useful to constrain the main driving mechanism for their galactic outflows.

Original languageEnglish
Article number18
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume810
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep 1

Keywords

  • Galaxies: abundances
  • Galaxies: evolution
  • Galaxies: formation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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