Fuzzy self-organizing map in cerebral cortical structure for pattern recognition

N. Homma, M. M. Gupta

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper demonstrates that a novel neural structure can be useful for formation of long-term memory. An essential core of the proposed model is a control signal for learning or memory formation, inspired by a possible biological learning mechanism observed in cerebral cortices and hippocampus. From a biological point of view, the control signal can be generated by feedback connections between different cortical regions that correspond to specific functions in memory formation. The model involves the feedback from cognitive results based on the current long-term memories, representing the current knowledge, to a control signal that decides whether the present input should be memorized or not. Simulation results show that the model can posses some biologically observed features of human memory system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages539-544
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventNAFIPS 2004 - Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society: Fuzzy Sets in the Heart of the Canadian Rockies - Banff, Alta, Canada
Duration: 2004 Jun 272004 Jun 30

Other

OtherNAFIPS 2004 - Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society: Fuzzy Sets in the Heart of the Canadian Rockies
CountryCanada
CityBanff, Alta
Period04/6/2704/6/30

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Mathematics(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fuzzy self-organizing map in cerebral cortical structure for pattern recognition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Homma, N., & Gupta, M. M. (2004). Fuzzy self-organizing map in cerebral cortical structure for pattern recognition. 539-544. Paper presented at NAFIPS 2004 - Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society: Fuzzy Sets in the Heart of the Canadian Rockies, Banff, Alta, Canada. https://doi.org/10.1109/nafips.2004.1337358