Fungal wood decomposer activity induces niche separation between two dominant tree species seedlings regenerating on coarse woody material

Y. Fukasawa, Y. Komagata, S. Ushijima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decomposition subsystems have an essential role in forest dynamics but few studies demonstrate the effect of microbial decay traits on seedling regeneration. In the present study, we focused on seedling regeneration on coarse woody material (CWM), which is an important regeneration site for forest tree species, and the effects of wood decay type according to fungal decay preference for wood structural components on seedling colonization. Effects of log properties including wood decay type and other environmental variables on seedling density were evaluated by ordination methods and generalized linear models. In total, 22 woody species were recorded as seedlings on Pinus densiflora logs. By ordination analysis, white rot in heartwood and brown rot in sapwood, as well as canopy openness and log diameter, showed significant association with seedling communities. The factors selected for a generalized linear model for explaining seedling densities of the two dominant seedling species Cryptomeria japonica and P. densiflora included brown rot in sapwood and white rot in heartwood, but the effects were different: a positive effect of brown rot on C. japonica and a negative effect of white rot on P. densiflora. These results suggested that wood decay type could induce niche separation between dominant tree species regenerating on CWM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Forest regeneration
  • Log
  • Rot type
  • Seedling colonization
  • Wood decay fungi

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Forestry
  • Ecology

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