Functional in vivo optical imaging of tumor angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis prevented by administration of anti-human VEGF antibody in xenograft model of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells

Aki Hanyu, Kiyotsugu Kojima, Kiyohiko Hatake, Kimie Nomura, Hironori Murayama, Yuichi Ishikawa, Satoshi Miyata, Masaru Ushijima, Masaaki Matsuura, Etsuro Ogata, Keiji Miyazawa, Takeshi Imamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in cancer progression and metastasis. Thus, blocking tumor angiogenesis is potentially a universal approach to prevent tumor establishment and metastasis. In this study, we used in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging to show that an antihuman vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody represses angiogenesis and the growth of primary tumors of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells in implanted nude mice. Interestingly, administering the antihuman VEGF antibody reduced the development of new blood vessels and normalized pre-existing tumor vasculature in HT1080 cell tumors. In addition, antihuman VEGF antibody treatment decreased lung metastasis from the primary tumor, whereas it failed to block lung metastasis in a lung colonization experiment in which tumor cells were injected into the tail vein. These results suggest that VEGF produced by primary HT1080 cell tumors has a crucial effect on lung metastasis. The present study indicates that the in vivo fluorescent microscopy system will be useful to investigate the biology of angiogenesis and test the effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors. (Cancer Sci 2009).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2085-2092
Number of pages8
JournalCancer science
Volume100
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Nov

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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