Functional and cognitive variables predicting successful use of chopsticks or a spoon by the paretic upper extremity in patients following stroke: a cross-sectional study

Kazuaki Iokawa, Toshimasa Sone, Takaaki Fujita, Tetsu Tsukada, Mariko Kaneda, Keiichi Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The factors necessary for successful use of chopsticks or a spoon, by patients with a paretic upper extremity (UE) following stroke are unknown. Objectives: We identified the functional capacities and interactions related to chopsticks or spoon use in patients with right hemiplegia following stroke. Methods: Participants were 139 stroke patients with right hemiplegia who required rehabilitation, divided into the following three categories: able to use chopsticks, able to use a spoon, or unable to use a spoon. We collected sociodemographic data, medical data, physical and cognitive function data, and functional grades associated with chopsticks or spoon use by the paretic dominant UE while eating. We identified a complex interaction of variables relating to functional use of chopsticks or a spoon using a classification and regression tree analytic process. Results: Patients with UE Brunnstrom recovery stage (BRS) >IV, and a Hasegawa Dementia Scale–Revised (HDS-R) score >16 had a 91.3% probability of being able to use chopsticks. Moreover, patients with a UE BRS of >IV, and the HDS-R score ≤16 had a 66.7% probability of being able to use a spoon. By contrast, patients with a UE BRS of ≤IV had a 90.5% probability of not being able to use a spoon. Conclusions: The interaction of BRS as a measure of UE function and HDS-R score as a measure of cognitive function affect the ability of patients with stroke histories to functionally use the paretic UE to operate chopsticks or a spoon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 2
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • activities of daily living
  • classification and regression tree analysis
  • cognitive function
  • dominant hand
  • practical hand
  • Stroke
  • upper extremity function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care
  • Clinical Neurology

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