Frequent Replication Errors at Microsatellite Loci in Tumors of Patients with Multiple Primary Cancers

Akira Horii, Hye Jung Han, Mamoru Shimada, Yusuke Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

215 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nearly 10% of cancer patients develop a second primary cancer within 10 years after surgical removal of the first tumor. Hence, detection of a genetic risk for developing multiple primary tumors would be of clinical importance. To investigate whether a genetic defect(s) involving the mismatch repair system constitutes an important risk factor in patients with multiple primary cancers, we examined replication errors (RER) at micro-satellite loci in 79 primary cancers which had developed among 38 patients with multiple primary cancers. The RER(+) phenotype was observed at five microsatellite loci on chromosomes 2,3,11, or 17 in tumors from 34 (89%) of 38 patients with multiple primary cancers but only in 19 tumors from 174 patients (11%) with a single primary cancer. Our results suggested that: (a) genetic instability may play an important role in development of multiple primary cancers, and (b) testing for RER in a primary cancer may be an appropriate approach to detection of patients at high risk for developing multiple primary cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3373-3375
Number of pages3
JournalCancer Research
Volume54
Issue number13
Publication statusPublished - 1994 Jul 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Frequent Replication Errors at Microsatellite Loci in Tumors of Patients with Multiple Primary Cancers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Horii, A., Han, H. J., Shimada, M., & Nakamura, Y. (1994). Frequent Replication Errors at Microsatellite Loci in Tumors of Patients with Multiple Primary Cancers. Cancer Research, 54(13), 3373-3375.