Fossil Newhousia imbricata (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae) from Postglacial Coral Reef Deposits in Tahiti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The calcareous brown alga Newhousia imbricata (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae) was found from postglacial reef deposits collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 310 from Tahiti. The alga is composed of successive tiers of bilayered laminae, each consisting of a basal cuboid hypodermal cell bearing smaller epidermal cells (one or two in cross-sectional profiles and three or four in long-sectional profiles). The laminae are separated by extracellular cement. Modern N. imbricata is known only from the Hawaiian Islands; this is the first reported occurrence of fossil N. imbricata.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-23
Number of pages6
JournalPaleontological Research
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Coral reef
  • Holocene
  • Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 310
  • Newhousia imbricata
  • Phaeophyceae
  • Tahiti

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Palaeontology

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