FGF9/16/20 and Wnt-5α signals are involved in specification of secondary muscle fate in embryos of the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi

Miki Tokuoka, Gaku Kumano, Hiroki Nishida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The tail muscle cells of the ascidian tadpole larva originate from two different lineages, the B- (primary) and A- and b- (secondary) line blastomeres of the eight-cell stage embryo. The primary muscle cells assume muscle fate cell-autonomously with the involvement of a localized muscle determinant, macho-1. On the other hand, fate determination of secondary muscle cells is a non-cell-autonomous process that depends on cellular interactions. In this paper, we investigated the mechanisms underlying fate specification of secondary muscle cells in Halocynthia roretzi. We found that FGF and Wnt5 signals were required. In contrast, the Nodal signal, which is required for specification of A-line muscle cells in another ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, was not necessary for the formation of any secondary muscle cells in Halocynthia embryo. Therefore, Halocynthia and Ciona show distinctly different mechanisms for generation of the secondary lineages, despite the fact that embryogenesis appears very similar between these species. We also found that the mechanisms involved in specification of A- and b-line muscle cells were distinct in that the required timing of the FGF signal for the A-line muscle cells preceded that for the b-line. Moreover, the inducer blastomeres for specification of these two lineages were different.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-527
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopment Genes and Evolution
Volume217
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ascidian embryo
  • Cellular interaction
  • FGF
  • Secondary muscle
  • Wnt5

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Developmental Biology

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