Faunal turnover of intermediate-water benthic foraminifera during the Paleogene in New Zealand

Kunio Kaiho, Hugh E.G. Morgans, Hisatake Okada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analysis of benthic foraminifera in upper Cretaceous through Oligocene bathyal sediments from East Coast, North Island, New Zealand demonstrates that the catastrophic extinction event of intermediate-water (100-1000 m) taxa occurred approximately 58-57 Ma during the latest Paleocene-early Eocene global warming. The following middle Eocene cooling produced stepwise origination events signifying the greatest turnover of the fauna. Most of the extinct species are aerobic forms, whereas the surviving taxa are dysaerobic forms. This interpretation suggests that a change of environment to low oxygen conditions was the main cause of the extinction. Following the extinction event, a dysaerobic fauna occupied the intermediate-water for about one million years. The stepwise appearance of new aerobic species in the middle Eocene indicates a gradual increase of dissolved oxygen in the intermediate-water.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-86
Number of pages36
JournalMarine Micropaleontology
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Palaeontology

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