Factors related to turnover intentions and work-related injuries and accidents among professional caregivers: A cross-sectional questionnaire study

Maki Tei-Tominaga, Miharu Nakanishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Japanese health and welfare industry has a shortage of professional caregivers, and work-related accidents and injuries among this group are therefore especially critical issues. This study aimed to examine the factors associated with turnover intentions and work-related injuries and accidents among professional caregivers in Japan. Methods: Self-report questionnaires were distributed to care workers (N = 1396) at 26 geriatric-care facilities. The questionnaire addressed basic attributes, work and organizational characteristics, wage adequacy, and intrinsic motivations for work (e.g., "being suited to caring work"). Social-relational aspects of the work environment were assessed via three subscales of the Social Capital and Ethical Climate in the Workplace instrument (i.e., "Social Capital in the Workplace,""Exclusive Workplace Climate,"and "Ethical Leadership"). Dependent variables were the experience of work-related accidents or injuries in the prior year and organizational and occupational turnover intentions. We used datasets of professional caregivers for analyses. Results: The response rate was 68% (N = 949). Among the 667 professional caregivers, 63% were female. On multivariable logistic regression analysis for work-related accidents and injuries for each sex, those with higher scores for "being suited to caring work"were found to experience significantly fewer work-related accidents and injuries (odds ratio [OR] = 0.78, p < 0.01) among female caregivers. Male caregivers who perceived an exclusive workplace climate experienced more work-related accidents and injuries (OR = 1.61, p < 0.01). However, experience of work-related accidents and injuries did not show significant relationships with organizational and occupational turnover intentions. Additionally, "being suited to caring work"(OR = 0.73, p < 0.01) and ethical leadership (OR = 0.76, p < 0.05) were found to be negatively associated with organizational turnover intentions. "Being suited to caring work"(OR = 0.61, p < 0.01), inadequacy of wage (OR = 2.22, p < 0.05), and marital status (OR = 2.69, p < 0.01) were also associated with occupational turnover intentions of professional caregivers. Conclusions: These findings highlight the need to foster intrinsic motivations for work as well as providing a supportive and ethical work environment to reduce high turnover rates and work-related injuries and accidents among professional caregivers.

Original languageEnglish
Article number24
JournalEnvironmental health and preventive medicine
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jun 26
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Professional caregiver
  • Turnover
  • Work environment
  • Work-related accident and injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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