Factors affecting the nocturnal decrease in blood pressure: A community-based study in Ohasama

Yutaka Imai, Akimitsu Nishiyama, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Ichiro Tsuji, Kenichi Nagai, Noriko Kikuchi, Hiroshi Satoh, Shigeru Hisamichi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To investigate factors affecting the nocturnal decrease in blood pressure. Design. A cross-sectional study of 823 community-based untreated subjects aged > 20 years. Screening and ambulatory blood pressures were measured and the effects of age and the ambulatory blood pressure on the nocturnal decrease were examined. Results. The magnitude of the decrease and the percentage decrease in the nocturnal blood pressure increased with increasing daytime ambulatory blood pressure and decreased with increasing night-time ambulatory blood pressure. Although the magnitude of the nocturnal decrease in blood pressure increased with increasing daytime blood pressure, the nocturnal blood pressure levels in hypertensives were still higher than those in normotensive subjects. The magnitude decreased with increasing age for men but not for women, whereas the percentage decrease decreased with increasing age both for men and for women. The SD of the 24 h blood pressure correlated strongly to the magnitude of the nocturnal decrease (systolic blood pressure r = 0.62, P < 0.0001; diastolic blood pressure r = 0.52, P < 0.0001), suggesting that the SD of the 24 h blood pressure is representative of the nocturnal decrease. A minimal nocturnal decrease was observed frequently in elderly normotensive men but infrequently in hypertensive individuals from the general population. A marked nocturnal decrease was observed frequently in hypertensive women aged > 70 years. Conclusion. Although the magnitude of the nocturnal decrease in blood pressure increased with increasing daytime blood pressure, the nocturnal blood pressure levels increased with increasing daytime ambulatory blood pressure. Therefore, the blood pressure in hypertensive subjects should essentially be lowered throughout the 24 h period. A marked nocturnal decrease in blood pressure in some elderly hypertensive women was observed without treatment. The nocturnal blood pressure levels of such subjects should be considered during treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)827-838
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Age
  • Ambulatory monitoring
  • Blood pressure
  • Magnitude
  • Nocturnal decrease
  • Percentage decrease
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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