Exposure to electrophiles impairs reactive persulfide-dependent redox signaling in neuronal cells

Hideshi Ihara, Shingo Kasamatsu, Atsushi Kitamura, Akira Nishimura, Hiroyasu Tsutsuki, Tomoaki Ida, Kento Ishizaki, Takashi Toyama, Eiko Yoshida, Hisyam Abdul Hamid, Minkyung Jung, Tetsuro Matsunaga, Shigemoto Fujii, Tomohiro Sawa, Motohiro Nishida, Yoshito Kumagai, Takaaki Akaike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrophiles such as methylmercury (MeHg) affect cellular functions by covalent modification with endogenous thiols. Reactive persulfide species were recently reported to mediate antioxidant responses and redox signaling because of their strong nucleophilicity. In this study, we used MeHg as an environmental electrophile and found that exposure of cells to the exogenous electrophile elevated intracellular concentrations of the endogenous electrophilic molecule 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitrocGMP), accompanied by depletion of reactive persulfide species and 8-SHcGMP which is a metabolite of 8-nitro-cGMP. Exposure to MeHg also induced S-guanylation and activation of H-Ras followed by injury to cerebellar granule neurons. The electrophile-induced activation of redox signaling and the consequent cell damage were attenuated by pretreatment with a reactive persulfide species donor. In conclusion, exogenous electrophiles such as MeHg with strong electrophilicity impair the redox signaling regulatory mechanism, particularly of intracellular reactive persulfide species and therefore lead to cellular pathogenesis. Our results suggest that reactive persulfide species may be potential therapeutic targets for attenuating cell injury by electrophiles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1673-1684
Number of pages12
JournalChemical Research in Toxicology
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

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