Experimental and theoretical study of secondary acoustic instability of downward propagating flames: Higher modes and growth rates

Ajit K. Dubey, Yoichiro Koyama, Nozomu Hashimoto, Osamu Fujita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Flames propagating in tubes open at the ignition end typically show two different kinds of thermo-acoustic instability namely, primary and secondary. Secondary acoustic instability is accompanied by parametric instability of flame front during which, cellular structures on the flame surface oscillate with half the acoustic frequency of excitation. The growth rates associated with secondary acoustic instability of flame structure are higher compared to primary instability of flames leading to very high peak pressures. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical study on parametric instability of downward propagating C2H4/O2/CO2 flames at two different Le of 1.0 and 0.8. Lower Le mixtures are found to be more unstable. Parametric instability of higher acoustic modes is reported for the first time for gaseous fuels. Higher modes of parametric instability transitioned successively to lower modes as the flame propagated downward. Growth rate of parametric instability is measured in experiments. Theoretical prediction of growth rate is done based on velocity coupling mechanism. Theoretical calculations provide good approximation of growth rates and its variation with frequency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-326
Number of pages11
JournalCombustion and Flame
Volume205
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Combustion tube
  • Downward propagating flames
  • Higher modes
  • Lewis number
  • Parametric instability
  • Secondary instability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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