Evolutionary and functional diversity of the 5′ untranslated region of enterovirus D68: Increased activity of the internal ribosome entry site of viral strains during the 2010s

Yuki Furuse, Natthawan Chaimongkol, Michiko Okamoto, Hitoshi Oshitani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the RNA genomes of enteroviruses possesses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs translation of the mRNA by binding to ribosomes. Infection with enterovirus D68 causes respiratory symptoms and is sometimes associated with neurological disorders. The number of reports of the viral infection and neurological disorders has increased in 2010s, although the reason behind this phenomenon remains unelucidated. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary and functional diversity of the 5′ UTR of recently circulating strains of the virus. Genomic sequences of 374 viral strains were acquired and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The IRES activity of the viruses was measured using a luciferase reporter assay. We found a highly conserved sequence in the 5′ UTR and also identified the location of variable sites in the predicted RNA secondary structure. IRES activities differed among the strains in some cell lines, including neuronal and respiratory cells, and were especially high in strains of a major lineage from the recent surge. The effect of mutations in the 50 UTR should be studied further in the future for better understanding of viral pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number626
JournalViruses
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul

Keywords

  • Enterovirus
  • Evolution
  • Internal ribosome entry site
  • Noncoding region
  • Phylogeny
  • Untranslated region

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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