Evaluation of the reconfiguration effects of planetary rovers on their lateral traversing of sandy slopes

Hiroaki Inotsume, Masataku Sutoh, Kenji Nagaoka, Keiji Nagatani, Kazuya Yoshida

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rovers that are used to explore craters on the Moon or Mars require the mobility to negotiate sandy slopes, on which slippage can easily occur. Such slippage can be reduced by actively readjusting the attitude of the rovers. By changing attitude, rovers can modify the position of their center of gravity and the wheel-soil contact angle. In this study, we discuss the effects of attitude changes on downhill sideslip based on the slope failure mechanism and experiments on reconfiguring the rover attitude and wheel angles. We conducted slope-traversing experiments using a wheeled rover under various roll angles and wheel angles. The experimental results show that the contact angle between wheels and slopes has a dominant influence on sideslip when compared with that of readjusting the rover's center of gravity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2012
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages3413-3418
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781467314039
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1
Event 2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2012 - Saint Paul, MN, United States
Duration: 2012 May 142012 May 18

Publication series

NameProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation
ISSN (Print)1050-4729

Other

Other 2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySaint Paul, MN
Period12/5/1412/5/18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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