Evaluation of several calibration techniques for pressure sensitive paint in transonic testing

Yuichi Shimbo, Keisuke Asai, Hiroshi Kanda, Yoshimi Iijima, Nobuyoshi Komatsu, Shinya Kita, Mitsuo Ishiguro

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A pressure sensitive paint (PSP) was applied to a large transonic wind tunnel testing of a rocket fairing model at M=0.9 and three paint calibration techniques were evaluated by comparing the paint data with intensive pressure tap measurements. A temperature sensitive paint (TSP) was also applied in a separate run to compensate for temperature dependency of the PSP. The test results showed an advantage of the in situ calibration with five pressure tap data because the taps covered a whole pressure and temperature range on the paint surface in this particular experiment. The simple a priori calibration was found to be unsuitable due to a temperature distribution at transonic regime. A newly proposed PSP/TSP combined calibration which used both the PSP and TSP measurements also showed good agreement with the pressure tap data without using any pressure tap data. This method would be useful in a blowdown tunnel application and a pressure measurement with an existing model with no pressure tap. However, further evaluation is necessary by taking both PSP and TSP images simultaneously. Finally, a linear affine transformation was applied to extract pressure data at an arbitrary point on the model and showed possibility of a future multi-camera application.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes
EventAdvanced Measurement and Ground Testing Technology Conference, AIAA 1998 - Albuquerque, United States
Duration: 1998 Jun 151998 Jun 18

Other

OtherAdvanced Measurement and Ground Testing Technology Conference, AIAA 1998
CountryUnited States
CityAlbuquerque
Period98/6/1598/6/18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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