Etiological role and repeated infections of sapovirus among children aged less than 2 years in a cohort study in a peri-urban community of Peru

Xiaofang Liu, Helena Jahuira, Robert H. Gilman, Alicia Alva, Lilia Cabrera, Michiko Okamoto, Hang Xu, Henry J. Windle, Dermot Kelleher, Marco Varela, Manuela Verastegui, Maritza Calderon, Gerardo Sanchez, Vanessa Sarabia, Sarah B. Ballard, Caryn Bern, Holger Mayta, Jean E. Crabtree, Vitaliano Cama, Mayuko SaitoHitoshi Oshitani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human sapovirus has been shown to be one of the most important etiologies in pediatric patients with acute diarrhea. However, very limited data are available about the causative roles and epidemiology of sapovirus in community settings. A nested matched case-control study within a birth cohort study of acute diarrhea in a peri-urban community in Peru from 2007 to 2010 was conducted to investigate the attributable fraction (AF) and genetic diversity of sapovirus. By quantitative reverse transcription realtime PCR (qPCR) sapovirus was detected in 12.4% (37/299) of diarrheal and 5.7% (17/300) of nondiarrheal stools (P=0.004). The sapovirus AF (7.1%) was higher in the second year (13.2%) than in the first year (1.4%) of life of children. Ten known genotypes and one novel cluster (n=5) within four genogroups (GI, GII, GIV, and GV) were identified by phylogenetic analysis of a partial VP1 gene. Further sequence analysis of the full VP1 gene revealed a possible novel genotype, tentatively named GII.8. Notably, symptomatic reinfections with different genotypes within the same (n=3) or different (n=5) genogroups were observed in eight children. Sapovirus exhibited a high attributable burden for acute gastroenteritis, especially in the second year of life, of children in a Peruvian community. Further large-scale studies are needed to understand better the global burden, genetic diversity, and repeated infections of sapovirus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1598-1604
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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