Estimating woody debris recruitment in a stream caused by a typhoon-induced landslide: A case study of typhoon Lionrock in Iwaizumi, Iwate prefecture, Japan

Thapthai Chaithong, Daisuke Komori, Yuto Sukegawa, Satoshi Anzai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A landslide can generate large amounts of debris in the form of boulders, cobbles, soil, and wood. The woody debris produced by a landslide flows into a downstream river or village; it can form obstructions in the stream and destroy houses. In this study, we aimed to develop a procedure for estimating woody debris recruitment into streams following a landslide. Understanding the volume of woody debris can help predict and prevent hazards from this debris. The proposed procedure combines a shallow landslide model, tree density data, and observational data following landslide occurrence. The study site is a sub-watershed of the Omoto River watershed in the town of Iwaizumi in Iwate prefecture in Japan; this town was affected by Typhoon Lionrock in 2016. Typhoon Lionrock delivered over 200mm of rainfall in 24 h and induced many landslides. Based on field surveys, we found that approximately 524 m3 of woody debris jammed the narrow section under a railway bridge (including voids) and approximately 178 m3 of woody debris to formed a dam in the stream channel of the target watershed (including voids). Using the proposed protocol, we estimate that woody debris recruitment to the stream was approximately 638 m3.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1071-1084
Number of pages14
JournalGeomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 9

Keywords

  • Debris flow
  • Landslide
  • Typhoon
  • Wood debris
  • Woody debris dam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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