Effects of visual cue and spatial distance on exitability in electronic negotiation

Taketoshi Hatta, Ohbuchi Ken-ichi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We examined the effects of the visual anonymity of self and spatial distance on exitability in electronic negotiation in a role-play experiment. Exitability is the psychological factor that causes one to perceive the negotiation as unstable. We predicted that the lack of visual information and the spread of spatial distance would reduce anticipation of retaliation, make the continuation norm less salient, and prompt to exit from the current negotiation. Visual anonymity was manipulated by two conditions (visual anonymity or non-anonymity conditions). Spatial distance was manipulated by two conditions (remote or close conditions). Forty-three students were assigned in one of these four conditions, and negotiated. The results showed both the visual anonymity and remote distance inhibited the activation of continuation norm, prompted to exit from the current negotiation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1542-1551
    Number of pages10
    JournalComputers in Human Behavior
    Volume24
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jul

    Keywords

    • Continuation norm
    • Electronic negotiation
    • Exit behavior
    • Exitability
    • Spatial distance
    • Visual anonymity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Human-Computer Interaction
    • Psychology(all)

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