Effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake and huge tsunami on glycaemic control and blood pressure in patients with diabetes mellitus

Susumu Ogawa, Mikihito Ishiki, Kazuhiro Nako, Masashi Okamura, Miho Senda, Takuya Sakamoto, Sadayoshi Ito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effects of a huge tsunami resulting from the Great East Japan Earthquake on blood pressure (BP) control and glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Tohoku University, Japan. Participants: 63 patients were visiting Rikuzentakata Hospital for diabetic treatment before the earthquake and returned to the clinic in July after the earthquake, and they were analysed in the present study. The subjects were divided into two groups: those who were hit by the tsunami, the Tsunami (+) group (n=28), and those who were not, the Tsunami (-) group (n=35), and the groups' parameters and their changes were compared. Primary outcome measure: Changes of HbA1c. Secondary outcome measures: Changes of BP, body mass index. Results: HbA1c and both BP increased, while the numbers of most drugs taken decreased in both groups. Parameter changes were significantly greater in the Tsunami (+) group. All medical data stored at the hospital was lost in the tsunami. The Tsunami (+) patients also had their own records of treatment washed away, so it was difficult to replicate their pre-earthquake drug prescriptions afterwards. In comparison, the Tsunami (-) patients kept their treatment information, making it possible to resume the treatment they had been receiving before the earthquake. The BP rose only slightly in men, whereas it rose sharply in women, even though they had not been directly affected by the tsunami. BP rose markedly in both genders affected by the tsunami. Conclusions: All medical information was lost in the tsunami, and glycaemic and BP controls of the tsunami-affected patients worsened more than those of patients who had been affected by the earthquake alone. Women may be more sensitive to changes in the living environment that result from a major earthquake than are men.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA7
JournalBMJ open
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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