Effects of randomization of partially hydrogenated corn oil on fatty acid and cholesterol absorption, and tissue lipid levels in rats

Tamiho Koga, Takako Yamato, Ikuo Ikeda, Michihiro Sugano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Randomization of partially hydrogenated corn oil containing approximately 45% of trans octadecenoic acid only slightly, but not significantly, increased the lymphatic fatty acid absorption in rats. No effect of randomization was observed on cholesterol absorption. When rats were fed these fats at the 8.8% level (with 1.2% safflower oil) for three weeks, the concentrations of serum cholesterol, and serum and liver phospholipid were significantly higher in randomized fat than in control fat, which was composed of 9% high-oleic safflower oil and 1% palm oil. Liver cholesterol tended to be higher in randomized fat. In contrast, nonrandomized fat was not hyperlipidemic compared to control fat. Although the fatty acid composition of liver phospholipids suggested a possible interference of trans fatty acid with the metabolism of linoleic acid to arachidonic acid, there was no effect of randomization. In the two hydrogenated fat groups, trans octadecenoic acid was incorporated and distributed similarly in adipose tissue triacylglycerol. These observations indicated that randomization of partially hydrogenated fat is not beneficial to various lipid parameters in rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-940
Number of pages6
JournalLipids
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Cell Biology

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