Effects of protease-treated royal jelly on muscle strength in elderly nursing home residents: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response study

Ge Meng, Honglei Wang, Yinghua Pei, Yanmei Li, Hongmei Wu, Yanqi Song, Qi Guo, Hui Guo, Shinobu Fukushima, Tomoki Tatefuji, Jiazhong Wang, Huanmin Du, Qian Su, Wen Zhang, Suxing Shen, Xiuyang Wang, Renwei Dong, Peipei Han, Tatsuma Okazaki, Ryoichi NagatomiJianhua Wang, Guowei Huang, Zhong Sun, Kun Song, Kaijun Niu

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although we have found that protease-treated royal jelly (pRJ) benefit for the skeletal muscle mass and strength in the aged animals, the potential beneficial effects have not been evaluated in humans. The aim of this study was to determine whether pRJ intake had beneficial effects on muscle strength in elderly nursing home residents. One hundred and ninety-four subjects enrolled into this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Subjects received either placebo(Group 1), pRJ 1.2 g/d(Group 2), or 4.8 g/d(Group 3). Data through 1 year are reported for 163 subjects. The primary outcome measure is handgrip strength. Secondary outcomes include several physical performance tests (six-minute walk test, timed up and go test, and standing on one leg with eyes closed). The dropout rate was 16.0%. The means (95% confidence interval) of change in handgrip strength for placebo, low-dose, and high-dose groups are -0.98(-2.04,0.08), 0.50(-0.65,1.65) and 1.03(-0.37,2.44) kg (P = 0.06, P for trend = 0.02), respectively. No significant effects of the interventions were observed for physical performances. These findings suggest that pRJ treatment might not improve, but rather attenuate the progression of decrease in muscle strength in elderly people. In addition, we have not found that pRJ intervention can achieve improvement or attenuating the decrease in physical performance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11416
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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