Effects of low-molecular-weight additives on interfacial tension of polymer blends: Experiments for poly(dimethylsiloxane)/ poly(tetramethyldisiloxanylethylene) + oligo(dimethylsiloxane), and comparison with mean-field calculations

Y. Sakane, K. Inomata, H. Morita, T. Kawakatsu, M. Doi, T. Nose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of low-molecular-weight additives on the interfacial behavior of polymer blends have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The measured interfacial tension near the critical solution temperature Tc for poly(dimethylsiloxane)/poly(tetramethyldisiloxanylethylene) as a function of temperature is merely shifted by the addition of oligo(dimethylsiloxane) corresponding to the decrease of Tc, giving only a subtle adsorption effect in interfacial behavior. Theoretical calculations have also been carried out for polymer/polymer/ additive ternary systems using the square-gradient theory (SGT) and the dynamic mean-field (DMF) calculation. The experimental results are quite consistent with theoretical predictions. Further theoretical calculations demonstrate that higher molecular weights and less miscibility with matrix polymers are most effective for a large adsorption of additives in the interface, leading to a large reduction of interfacial tension. SGT and DMF are found to predict almost the same interfacial tension and composition profiles in ternary polymeric systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3883-3891
Number of pages9
JournalPolymer
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Additive
  • Interfacial tension
  • Polymer blend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

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