Effects of intravenous injection of butyrate on the exocrine pancreatic secretion in guinea pigs

K. Katoh, T. Tsuda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    1. 1. The stimulus-secretion coupling in the pancreatic exocrine responses to i.v. injection of sodium butyrate was investigated in guinea pigs in vivo and in vitro. 2. 2. Intravenous single injection of sodium butyrate (12.5-100 μmol/100g body wt) caused an increase in fluid and amylase secretion in a dose-dependent manner. The responses evoked by sodium butyrate (100 μmol/100g body wt) were not affected by prior injection of atropine (0.14 μmol/100g body wt) or hexamethonium (4 μmol/100g body wt). 3. 3. The chloride concentration in secreted fluid increased slightly with an increase in flow rate in response to sodium butyrate, but decreased in response to secretin. 4. 4. The amylase release from the pancreatic segments evoked by sodium butyrate (10-6-10-2M) increased dose-dependently. The responses were potentiated in the presence of secretin (1 C.H.R.u./ml), but were suppressed in the presence of acetylcholine (10-6 M) or in a Ca-free solution containing EGTA (10-4 M). 5. 5. These results suggest that the secretory effects in response to i.v. injection of sodium butyrate probably arise from direct action on the acinar cells, and that an increase in cellular calcium concentration might be an important step in the secretion process, in guinea pig exocrine pancreas.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)569-572
    Number of pages4
    JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology
    Volume87
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1987

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physiology

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