Effect of radiation monitoring method and formula differences on estimated physician dose during percutaneous coronary intervention

K. Chida, Y. Morishima, H. Masuyama, H. Chiba, Y. Katahira, Y. Inaba, I. Mori, S. Maruoka, S. Takahashi, M. Kohzuki, M. Zuguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Currently, one or two dosimeters are used to monitor radiation exposure in most cardiac laboratories. In addition, several different formulas are used to convert exposure data into an effective dose (ED). Purpose: To clarify the effect of monitoring methods and formula selection on the estimated ED for physicians during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). Material and Methods: The ED of physicians during cardiac catheterization was determined using an optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (Luxel badge). Two Luxel badges were worn: one beneath a personal lead apron (0.35-mm lead equivalent) at the chest and one outside of the apron at the neck. Results: The difference in the average ED of seven physicians was approximately fivefold (range 1.13-5.43 mSv/year) using the six different formulas in the clinical evaluation. The estimated physician ED differed markedly according to both the monitoring method and formula selected. Conclusion: ED estimation is dependent on both the monitoring method and the formula used. Therefore, it is important that comparisons among laboratories are based on the same monitoring method and same formula for calculating the ED.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-173
Number of pages4
JournalActa Radiologica
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Angioplasty
  • Catheterization
  • Coronary intervention
  • Interventional
  • Radiation exposure
  • Radiation safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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