Effect of Organic matter application on the fate of15N-labeled ammonium fertilizer in an upland soil

T. Nishio, N. Oka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of the application of organic matter on the fate of15N-labeled ammonium was investigated in a field. The organic materials incorporated into the experimental plots consisted of wheat straw, rape, pig compost, cow compost, plant manure. In May 2000, 10 g N m−2 of15N-labeled ammonium was applied to the field together with the organic materials, and maize and winter wheat were consecutively cultivated. The recovery of applied15N in soils and plants was determined after the harvest of each crop. Although only about 10% of the applied15N-labeled fertilizer remained in the 0-30 cm layer of the Control Plot and the Plant Manure Plot, more than 25% of the applied15N remained in the Pig Compost Plot. Amount and proportion of the immobilized15N to those of total N or microbial biomass N in soils were determined for the topsoil samples (0–10 cm layer). The amounts of both microbial biomass N and total immobilized15N in soil were highest in the Pig Compost Plot. Although the amount of microbial biomass N was comparable to the amount of immobilized15N-labeled fertilizer in soil, the amounts of15N-labeled fertilizer contained in the microbial biumass accounted for less than 10% of the amount of total immobilized15N in soil. The ratio of the amount of15N-labeled fertilizer contained in biomass N to the total amount of biomass N was one order of magnitude higher than the ratio of the amount of immobilized15N-labeled fertilizer to the amount of total N in soil. No conspicuous changes in the amount of immobilized15N in soil were observed during the cultivation of winter wheat except for the Pig Compost Plot. No significant correlation was recognized between the amount of15N-labeled fertilizer contained in microbial biomass before wheat cultivation and that of15N-labeled fertilizer absorbed by wheat, indicating that microbial N immobilized during the growth period of the former crop (maize) was not a significant source of N for the latter crop (wheat).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-403
Number of pages7
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Immobilization
  • Microbial biomass
  • N-labeled ammonium
  • Organic matter application

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

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