Effect of α1-acidic glycoprotein in the ascitic fluid of cancer patients on human NK cells: Selective suppression of interferon-induced NK activation

Hisashi Aso, Keiji Tamura, Michael T. Rose, Yoshihisa Tomioka, Michinao Mizugaki, Nakao Ishida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The in vitro effect of C-AGP (pure α1-acid glycoprotein from the ascitic fluid of cancer patients) on NK cell cytotoxicity was tested using normal healthy human PBMC. C-AGP had no inhibitory effect on basal NK cell activity. C-AGP selectively suppressed the augmentation of NR cell activity by rIFNαA and rIFNγ, but C-AGP did not prevent the NK activation by rIL-2. NK cells in PBMC treated with C-AGP for 12 h and then washed just once, to remove the C-AGP, fully recovered the ability to respond to rIFNαA. However, after the treatment of PBMC with C-AGP for 5 or 6 days, NK cells failed to respond to rIFNαA, in spite of washing to remove C-AGP from the cultures. Monocytes were necessary for the suppressive effect of C-AGP on rIFNαA activation of NK cells. Indomethacin restored the ability of NK cells to respond to rIFN(yA in C-AGP treated PBMC. These results suggest that monocytes are able to selectively suppress the response of NK cells to IFNs in the presence of, or following treatment with C-AGP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-129
Number of pages13
JournalInflammation
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Jan 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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