Ecological studies on the community of drifting seaweeds in the south-eastern coastal waters of Izu Peninsula, central Japan. II: Seasonal changes in plants showing maximum stipe length in drifting seaweed communities

Tetsu Hirata, Jiro Tanaka, Tetsuo Iwami, Takashi Ohmi, Akihiro Dazai, Masakazu Aoki, Hajime Ueda, Yasutaka Tsuchiya, Toshihiko Sato, Yasutsugu Yokohama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined seasonal patterns in 20 sargassaceous species (maximum stipe length of ≥45 cm) from 902 patches of drifting seaweeds in the southeastern coastal waters of the Izu Peninsula, central Japan, between spring and autumn, 1991-1993. The first analysis, dealing with plants occurring for three consecutive years, examined the top three ranked species determined from monthly pooled means of frequency of appearance in these 3 years. The second analysis examined not only the top-ranked species in monthly means in each year, but also the continuity of appearance of species among years. The third analysis was made from dendrogram analysis based on monthly samples from each year. The first and second analyses revealed three seasonally discernible changes. From April to June, dominance shifted from Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh to Sargassum yamamotoi Yoshida with a stable transition; in July, S. yamamotoi, Sargassum macrocarpum C. Agardh, Sargassum crispifolium Yamada and Sargassum piluliferum (Turner) C. Agardh appeared consistently in an unstable domination with low frequency of appearance by Sargassum nipponicum Yendo, Sargassum fulvellum (Turner) C. Agardh, S. macrocarpum or S. crispifolium; in August to October, there was a stable shift from S. macrocarpum to Sargassum micracanthum (Kützing) Endlicher and Sargassum ringgoldianum Harvey. In the third analysis, monthly samples from each year were divided into four groups, characterized using the top five ranks. This characterization indicated that the top-ranked species shifted from S. horneri to S. yamamotoi, to S. macrocarpum and to S. micracanthum with the change of seasons. Because of an overlap in the characteristic species in these three analyses, seven species (S. horneri, S. micracanthum, S. yamamotoi, S. macrocarpum, S. ringgoldianum, S. nipponicum and S. crispifolium) were regarded as dominant species. Results are compared to our previous study and it is suggested that the similarity in the pattern of plant community during seasonal changes over the period from April to June and in July resulted from both stable and unstable changes, respectively, but discrepancies in the pattern of plant community during seasonal change from August to October were the result of differences in the frequency of appearance of S. ringgoldianum and S. macrocarpum in August 1991. These results indicated that the seasonal changes of dominant species in the plant community from April to October in this study area were periodic except in July.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-191
Number of pages6
JournalPhycological Research
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Drifting seaweeds
  • Izu Peninsula
  • Maximum stipe length
  • Plant community
  • Sargassum
  • Seasonal changes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science

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