Earthquake-induced flow-type slope failures in volcanic sandy soils and tentative evaluation of the fluidization properties of soils

M. Kazama, T. Kawai, J. Kim, M. Takagi, T. Morita, T. Unno

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Japan has many experiences of mudflow-type failures of volcanic sandy soil slopes during earthquakes. Firstly in this paper, several major cases of the flow-type failures are outlined. In general, undisturbed pyroclastic deposits have high strength against to fluidization because of its cementation effect. However, once the deposits are disturbed to use as an earth fill materials, the shear strength of disturbed soils cannot be expected. Rather, the disturbed pyroclastic soils are weaker than ordinary sandy soils. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the fluidization property of disturbed pyroclastic sandy soils for mitigating mudflow disaster. In this study, we introduce a drum type testing machine to evaluate the fluidization property. Two kinds of volcanic sandy soils are used as a specimen sampled from volcanic area in Japan. In addition to this, the wireless multi sensor which can be installed in the movable soils is introduced.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVolcanic Rocks and Soils - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Volcanic Rocks and Soils, 2016
EditorsPaolo Tommasi, Tatiana Rotonda, Manuela Cecconi, Francesco Silvestri
PublisherCRC Press/Balkema
Pages175-176
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9781138028869
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1
EventInternational Workshop on Volcanic Rocks and Soils, 2015 - Lacco Ameno, Ischia Island, Italy
Duration: 2016 Sep 242016 Sep 25

Publication series

NameVolcanic Rocks and Soils - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Volcanic Rocks and Soils, 2015

Other

OtherInternational Workshop on Volcanic Rocks and Soils, 2015
CountryItaly
CityLacco Ameno, Ischia Island
Period16/9/2416/9/25

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science

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