Do health beliefs, personality traits, and interpersonal concerns predict TB prevention behavior among Japanese adults?

Naomi Yoshitake, Mika Omori, Masumi Sugawara, Kiko Akishinonomiya, Sachiko Shimada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite public health measures and health-promotion efforts, the decline in tuberculosis (TB) morbidity in Japan has been slow, with a higher TB incidence rate relative to those observed in most developed countries. Because health behavior depends on multiple factors and is formulated within a social context, a theory-driven model would be necessary to increase TB prevention behavior. Based upon the Health Belief Model, this study examined the effects of health beliefs, personality traits, and social factors on TB prevention behavior among Japanese adults. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with a nationally representative sample (N = 911; 50.9% women; mean age 49.5, SD = 14.1). Path analyses gave empirical support for the hypothesized model, suggesting that TB prevention behaviors are influenced by not only perceived susceptibility to the illness but also social factors such as cues to action and one’s concern to benefit others. The findings have implications for research examining health communication tailored to individual differences in personality and interpersonal concern.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0211728
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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