DNA vaccine using invariant chain gene for delivery of CD4+T cell epitope peptide derived from Japanese cedar pollen allergen inhibits allergen-specific IgE response

Masako Toda, Michiyuki Kasai, Hiroyuki Hosokawa, Naoko Nakano, Yoshifumi Taniguchi, Sakae Inouye, Shuichi Kaminogawa, Toshitada Takemori, Masahiro Sakaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To establish a new immunotherapy for type I allergic diseases without allergic side effects, we attempted to develop a DNA vaccine encoding both a CD4+ T cell epitope site in a major Japanese cedar pollen allergen (Cry j 2) and an invariant chain (Ii) for the delivery of the epitope peptide into the MHC class II loading pathway. We constructed a plasmid DNA encoding the Ii mutant either by replacement of the core CLIP (class II-associated invariant chain peptide) with a peptide corresponding to the major Cry j 2 CD4+ T cell epitope in BALB/c mice, designated as p247-258 (pCPCJ2), or by fusion of the Ii with p247-258 at the C terminus (pliCJ2). As expected, repeated inoculation of BALB/c mice with pCPCJ2 or pliCJ2 induced no antibody response to Cry j 2. In contrast, intramuscular inoculation of BALB/c mice with pCPCJ2 or pliCJ2 predominantly induced p247-258-specific Th1 cells, resulting in the inhibition of lgE response to subsequent Cry j 2 injections. Our results demonstrated that the plasmid DNA encoding the CD4+ T cell epitope and Ii can induce epitope-specific CD4+ T cell responses in vivo and the potential to regulate type I allergic reaction without allergic side effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1631-1639
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Allergic disease
  • DNA vaccine
  • Invariant chain
  • T cell epitope

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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