Diurnal locomotion and feeding activities of two rice-ear bugs, Trigonotylus caelestialium and Stenotus rubrovittatus (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae)

Yusuke Suzuki, Masatoshi Hori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diurnal locomotion and feeding activities of Trigonotylus caelestialium (Kirkaldy) and Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) were investigated using a video camera and electrical penetration graph. Diurnal locomotion activity of T. caelestialium was higher in photophase than in scotophase, whereas that of S. rubrovittatus was higher in scotophase than in photophase. No difference was observed in the locomotion activity of T. caelestialium between mated and unmated bugs or between males and females. Locomotion activity of S. rubrovittatus was different between the sexes. The activity of females was higher than that of males. Diurnal rhythms of feeding activity were obscure compared with those of the locomotion activities in both mirids. The feeding behavior of T. caelestialium was significantly more active in the photophase than in the scotophase. In S. rubrovittatus, feeding activity of males was higher in the scotophase than in the photophase, whereas females showed no such difference. It is thought that both species of mirid bugs are active during the daytime and nighttime, although the locomotion and feeding activities of T. caelestialium were high in the photophase, while those of S. rubrovittatus were high in the scotophase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-157
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Entomology and Zoology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Feb 1

Keywords

  • Diurnal rhythm
  • Electrical
  • Feeding behavior
  • Locomotion behavior
  • Penetration graph
  • Rice-ear bug

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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